LONELY WHALE

One campaign, a few celebrity activists, and hundreds of octopus slaps get one major U.S. city to legislates a ban on plastics

Plastic pollution in our oceans feels like such an enormous problem, we often find ourselves wondering: “How can I possibly make a difference?”

We gave people an easy way to make a big impact: stop using plastic straws.  

 

In the U.S. alone, we use 500 million plastic straws every single day.  Many of those straws end up in the ocean, polluting the water and killing marine life. 

Case Study Video

Through a combination of experiential installations, a PSA, social media, collateral, and website we created a campaign to remove single-use plastic straws from thoughtless daily use. 

The Ocean Fights Back

At SXSW, we created a high-speed camera booth experience where willing participants got the plastic straw smacked out of their mouth by a giant octopus tentacle. In exchange, each sucker got their own slow-mo video to share on their social channels with their pledge to #StopSucking on plastic straws — for good. 

Good humored celebs and conference goers alike joined in the fun. 

Neil DeGrasse Tyson
Brooklyn Decker
Adrian Grenier
De La Sol
Getting people to #STOPSUCKING

After the fun at SXSW, it was time to start a movement. Social good campaigns can be heavy, so the lighthearted nature of the phrase "stop sucking" was intentional. It gave our celebrity influencers a chance to use some levity with it in this PSA, and then prompted direct challenges online for people to #StopSucking.

Making real change

Around the time Russel Wilson and Tom Douglas got involved, we knew we were making strides. Venues across the city started to go strawless including the Space Needle, Mariners Stadium, Seahawks Stadium, and all Tom Douglas restaurants. Pretty soon, Seattle became the first major U.S. city to legislate a ban on single-use plastic straws. 

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THE RESULTS

POSSIBLE, 2017

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